Author: Margaret Manning Shull

Margaret Manning Shull is currently part of the speaking and writing team at RZIM. She has served in pastoral roles focusing on teaching, discipleship, spiritual formation, and pastoral care. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology, with honors, from Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia, before earning her Masters of Divinity degree, summa cum laude, from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts.

Margaret is an ordained minister and is passionate about communicating the gospel in ways that engage both heart and mind. Her warm and relational teaching style, highlighted by her unique emphasis on conversational apologetics, are huge assets as she addresses the critical intersection between Christian faith and life. Margaret lives with her husband, David, in Bellingham, Washington.

April 3, 2017 / / Topics

We live in a culture that tries to avoid suffering at any cost. And yet it is an undeniable aspect of human existence. It informs us that something is amiss—that things are not right. It could be the painful struggle with cancer or a chaotic refugee crisis. Some view suffering as a karmic event—justly deserved by a person or a community. But we should not jump too quickly to equate suffering with punishment. There are thugs and thieves who seem to be exempt from suffering and there are humanitarians who…

March 20, 2017 / / Topics

Be it people, works of art, or musical compositions, we are drawn to things that are beautiful. Beauty stops us in our tracks. Driving around a mountain bend, we are lured to those cutouts in the road were people interrupt their trips, get out of their cars, and soak in the vistas. Driving down coastal highways, we take in the miles of breathless sights and marvel as the ocean nestles and sometimes crashes against the shoreline rock. We appreciate the layout of a wonderfully landscaped garden as the colours of…

December 26, 2016 / / Topics

Even with all the advancements in technology and apparent rise in living standards that promise happiness, there is still an alarming number of people who take their own lives—primarily men in their late 40s and 50s. Youth suicide rates are also of concern. “Hold on,” you say. “I thought this was supposed to be about hope.” So, why such a morbid introduction? The number one reason for people taking their own lives is a lack of hope—not being able to see past their immediate predicament and failing to see why…